Highly automated simulation calculation

The spin-off Renumics GmbH uses machine learning methods to make Computer Aided Engineering more efficient and take the strain off computational engineers.

Crash tests are an expensive affair. In early development stages, collision experiments are therefore often replaced by computer simulations that can be performed thousands of times taking various influential factors into account. These simulations are usually based on computer-supported processes, on so-called Computer Aided Engineering (CAE). This concept centres on computational engineers who compile numerical models, thus assisting constructors in the analysis and optimisation of their designs. The crucial time and cost factors here are the many manual work steps involved. For example, computational engineers invest a considerable amount of time in routine activities such as pre-processing geometries and integrating data instead of being able to concentrate on modelling and analytical work, which is precisely where Renumics comes in. This KIT spin-off has developed a software with which CAE can be auto­mated. In this context, machine learning methods help make simulations workflows considerably more efficient.

bwcon CyberOne Jurysitzung in Stuttgart

The Renumics founding team (left to right): Steffen Slavetinsky, Markus Stoll and Dr Stefan Suwelack.

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Automation – but not for the masses

The KIT spinoff robodev GmbH has developed an intelligent module construction kit for a profitable production of small quantities in manufacturing enterprises.

Robot-supported automation is experiencing a boom. Nowadays, the automobile branch in particular would be quite inconceivable without modern industrial robots. From punching sheet metal components to the complete car body, whole automation lines are in operation partly without any human action. It is no coincidence that the automobile industry has become the paragon in this area. As a rule, unlike in many other branches, extremely large quantities are involved that all have to be produced according to exactly the same pattern. “The cost of a simple automation solution is at least 80,000 euro. If smaller quantities, below 10,000 items per month, are involved, this investment will usually not pay its way. Slightly below 75 per cent of processes in the German manufacturing industry are therefore manual or have only been automated to a small degree,” explains Dr Andreas Bihlmaier, co-founder of robodev GmbH.

The robodev founders (left to right): Dr Julien Mintenbeck, Dr Jens Liedke and Dr Andreas Bihlmaier. Quelle: robodev

The robodev founders (left to right): Dr Julien Mintenbeck, Dr Jens Liedke and Dr Andreas Bihlmaier. Quelle: robodev

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An in-silico revolution in biotechnology

Enough experimenting! The KIT spinoff GoSilico enables the biopharmaceuticals branch to introduce the computer-supported development of manufacturing processes for new agents.

The way from the discovery of a promising agent to its authorisation is tedious. It involves countless experiments that not only cause high costs but also require a considerable amount of perseverance. “It can take up to ten years for a drug to enter the market,” says Dr Thiemo Huuk. This is a shortcoming that he tends to address together with his co-founders Prof Dr Jürgen Hubbuch, Dr Teresa Beck and Dr Tobias Hahn.

The founders of GoSilico (left to right): Dr. Thiemo Huuk, Dr. Tobias Hahn and Dr. Teresa Beck (Source: Foto Fabry)

The founders of GoSilico (left to right): Dr. Thiemo Huuk, Dr. Tobias Hahn and Dr. Teresa Beck (Source: Foto Fabry)

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Founder of the month July: GoSilico GmbH

gosilico_Logo_229x71The KIT spin-off GoSilico develops software for computer-assisted process development in the biopharmaceutical industry. Its simulation technology helps companies display experiments on their computers within seconds. We have interviewed the GoSilico GmbH team on their idea, the foundation of their company and their future perspective.

The founding team of GoSilico: Prof Dr Jürgen Hubbuch, Dr Teresa Beck, Dr Tobias Hahn und Dr Thiemo Huuk (left to right)

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New work spaces for start-ups: PionierGarage opens student incubator in Karlsruhe

“A place to help young entrepreneurs and students find cheap workspaces and the right infrastructure for their company foundation” – this is how Andreas Fischer has described Germany’s first student incubator, named “Launchpad”. Andreas Fischer is a member of the PionierGarage student group at KIT. He was involved in the planning of Launchpad. A “launch pad” is the starting place of a rocket. PionierGarage similarly aims to provide the necessary starting energy for projects in their early stages of foundation.

Eröffnung Launchpad

Andreas Fischer during the opening of Launchpad

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